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LIBAA News & Aviation Industry Updates

Business Aviation news from all over Long Island and the New York metropolitan area aviation companies, airports and government sources keeping you current on all the business aviation news that effects you and your company

Shuster: No FAA extension, yet

Politico / 3/29/2017 By Lauren Gardner 

House Transportation Chairman Bill Shuster said today the panel is still working on an FAA bill to keep the agency running into fiscal 2018 — and isn't considering an extension yet. 

Asked about the timing of a much-anticipated infrastructure bill at an event sponsored by The Hill, Shuster said that's still in flux, but added that the Sept. 30 expiration date for the FAA is “the timeframe I do have.”

“Along the way we'll see how things shake out, but again we're focused on making sure we have an FAA bill ready to go” by Sept. 30, he said. 

Whether or not to tie a broader infrastructure package to a tax code overhaul is “really a call leadership's going to make,” Shuster said. 

"I want to do an infrastructure bill, and if it goes standalone, I'm good with that," he said. "If leadership says it's better if we put them together, then that's going to be what we do." 

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White House explores air traffic control split off

Politico / 3/29/2017 By Kathryn A. Wolfe and Lauren Gardner

The White House is beginning to engage more on the idea of separating air traffic control from the FAA, including holding a meeting with aviation groupson Tuesday, though exactly how the administration will proceed remains to be seen.

On Tuesday, DJ Gribbin, President Donald Trump’s special assistant for infrastructure policy, hosted a town hall with aviation groups to hear their ideas about separating air traffic control from the FAA.

According to attendees interviewed for this article, Gribbin and his team didn’t tip their hats about their own game plan. One person in attendance said White House staff noted that they had spoken with House Transportation ChairmanBill Shuster(R-Pa.) and had looked at his proposal.

“It seemed like they were very familiar with the ins and outs” of Shuster’s plan, but otherwise were mostly there to listen,the person said.

The White House fiscal 2018“skinny budget”endorsed taking air traffic control away from the FAA, saying the administration supported shifting it “to an independent, non-governmental organization,” though it didn’t address whether that should be for profit or not.

One aviation industry attendee noted that was one of the questions Gribbin and his staff askedon Tuesday, “what people’s opinions were about how, if you remove it from FAA, then what is it? Is it a for-profit, is it a nonprofit, is it still a government agency? I’m actually going to give the White House staff a lot of credit, they did a very good job of really, in my opinion, making it a listening session and hearing ideas, concerns.”

Attendees included Airlines for America, the Air Line Pilots Association, the National Air Traffic Controllers Association, Delta Air Lines, the National Business Aviation Association, the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, the General Aviation Manufacturers Association, the American Association of Airport Executives, Airports Council International — North America, and former DOT Secretary Jim Burnley and former Sen. Byron Dorgan (D-N.D.).

A White House spokeswoman confirmed the meeting, and said the administration is “still surveying all the options. We’re still in the early stages.”

The next chance for the administration to put more meat on the bones of what it supports will come when it releases its full fiscal 2018 budget request, expected in May. Until then, focus will remain on Capitol Hill, with the clock ticking on aSept. 30deadline.

So far, Shuster is holding the line, insisting that he’s not behind the curve — even though by this time last year both his and the Senate’s bills had been marked up — and that he’s still gunning to make theSept. 30deadline.

When asked why the bill wasn’t moving as fast this time around, Shuster noted that the previous FAA reauthorization came in the second half of the last Congress. “We’ve got a new administration, we’ve got new members, so we’re working on it.” When asked if the bill would be changed substantially, Shuster mostly demurred.

“It’s a work in progress. We’re working on it. That’s all I can tell you right now. So again, it’s a different scenario from last year,” he said.

When asked about a timeline, or discussions about floor time, Shuster said he wasn’t sure. “Haven’t had those conversations yet.” Later, he added “I knowSept. 30the FAA expires, so that’s the time frame I do have.”

Rep.Rick Larsen(D-Wash.), the ranking member on the House Aviation subcommittee, said there’s no “particular timeline to produce something just yet.”

“We haven’t even seen Secretary Chao in front of the committee for anything. So I think that I’d certainly like to hear what the administration thinks generally about the FAA bill, there are a lot of issues separate from ATC that are going to be part of it,” Larsen said.

Most stakeholders don’t expect significant forward momentum until May at the earliest — timing that, if it holds, brings an extension even closer to reality, especially as Congress trudges forward with summer appropriations season, not to mention a potentially a major infrastructure proposal and a tax code overhaul.

Lobbyists noted that both Commerce and Transportation committee staff have been talking with various interest groups, but that they have yet to give signals about major changes to Shuster’s legislation. Additionally, the basic dynamics arrayed against overhauling air traffic control seemingly remain the same.

“I don’t think anyone knows exactly what will happen. Floor time dictates some of it, a lot of it will be a leadership decision on if they do an infrastructure package, and it seems pretty clear some of that’s going to be dictated by tax reform,” one lobbyist said.


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Islip launches new ‘stress less, pay less’ campaign for MacArthur Airport

Updated March 23, 2017 
By  sarah.armaghan@newsday.com

Islip Town officials want Long Islanders to know they will “stress less and pay less” when flying out of Long Island MacArthur Airport — a slogan unveiled Thursday morning as part of a new $180,000 marketing initiative.

Hoping to grow business at the airport, an advertising campaign will include promotional signs at Long Island Rail Road stations and on the sides of buses, and radio spots. A new logo features the airport code, ISP, next to a shaded map of the Island, and a new website, FlyMacArthur.com, has been launched.

“We are going to aggressively campaign against our New York competitors,

Kennedy and LaGuardia,” said Shelley LaRose Arken, the airport’s commissioner, at

a news conference inside the airport.

Arken said that, overall, MacArthur offers efficient security lines, convenient parking, and fewer delays and cancellations than other major airports in the metropolitan area. She also said flights at MacArthur are 45 percent less expensive than those at John F. Kennedy International Airport and 16 percent less costly than at LaGuardia Airport.

After the news conference, Arken said these statistics were gleaned from a quarterly U.S. Department of Transportation report, which showed the average price of all domestic fares for each U.S. airport in June 2016.

Carmela Bleich, general manager for Creative Travel International, a travel agency based in Melville, said “there’s no one straight answer” in comparing flight prices across airports and that availability, inventory and time of purchase all become factors in cost.

“You can’t really say that’s the case across the board that one is cheaper than the other,” said Bleich, who said she has been a travel agent for 30 years on Long Island. “If you’re talking about fare prices to the same destinations, saying they’re cheaper from MacArthur would not always be accurate.”

Residents in western Suffolk and in Nassau counties will be targeted in the advertising blitz in an attempt to lure them from booking travel through JFK and LaGuardia.

Southwest Airlines, Elite Airways and American Airlines currently operate seven daily nonstop flights out of MacArthur, and Arken hopes that by attracting new customers, additional flights will be added, followed by more nonstop routes and interest from other carriers.

“We think that a lot of the customers who are choosing our New York competitors are trapped in a really bad relationship,” Arken said. “What we can assure you is that if you choose to fly to Long Island MacArthur Airport, you will stress less and you will pay less.”  Officials from Islip Town, which owns and operates the Ronkonkoma airport, have been trying for years to develop new strategies that would aid the financially struggling airport, which operated at a loss totaling nearly $4 million from 2012 through 2014. According to figures provided by the town, 1,356,162 people flew to and from the airport in 2012; in 2016 that number was 1,211,951. In 2016, the total number of flights operating in and out of MacArthur was 124,164, down from 148,451 in 2012. Town expenditures have decreased at the airport over the last two years, resulting in a surplus of about $155,000 in 2015, town figures show.     Business7 airlines that flew away from LI's MacArthur Airport
 

 

 

 

“We are so, so committed to maximizing this incredible resource,” Town Supervisor Angie Carpenter said. “The airport is a tremendous economic generator with over $600 million in economic activity generated because of what happens here at this airport. The potential is huge.”

Read more...

Islip launches new ‘stress less, pay less’ campaign for MacArthur Airport

Updated March 23, 2017 
By  sarah.armaghan@newsday.com

Islip Town officials want Long Islanders to know they will “stress less and pay less” when flying out of Long Island MacArthur Airport — a slogan unveiled Thursday morning as part of a new $180,000 marketing initiative.

Hoping to grow business at the airport, an advertising campaign will include promotional signs at Long Island Rail Road stations and on the sides of buses, and radio spots. A new logo features the airport code, ISP, next to a shaded map of the Island, and a new website, FlyMacArthur.com, has been launched.

“We are going to aggressively campaign against our New York competitors, Kennedy and LaGuardia,” said Shelley LaRose Arken, the airport’s commissioner, at a news conference inside the airport.

Arken said that, overall, MacArthur offers efficient security lines, convenient parking, and fewer delays and cancellations than other major airports in the metropolitan area. She also said flights at MacArthur are 45 percent less expensive than those at John F. Kennedy International Airport and 16 percent less costly than at LaGuardia Airport.

After the news conference, Arken said these statistics were gleaned from a quarterly U.S. Department of Transportation report, which showed the average price of all domestic fares for each U.S. airport in June 2016.

Carmela Bleich, general manager for Creative Travel International, a travel agency based in Melville, said “there’s no one straight answer” in comparing flight prices across airports and that availability, inventory and time of purchase all become factors in cost.

“You can’t really say that’s the case across the board that one is cheaper than the other,” said Bleich, who said she has been a travel agent for 30 years on Long Island. “If you’re talking about fare prices to the same destinations, saying they’re cheaper from MacArthur would not always be accurate.”

Residents in western Suffolk and in Nassau counties will be targeted in the advertising blitz in an attempt to lure them from booking travel through JFK and LaGuardia.

Southwest Airlines, Elite Airways and American Airlines currently operate seven daily nonstop flights out of MacArthur, and Arken hopes that by attracting new customers, additional flights will be added, followed by more nonstop routes and interest from other carriers.

“We think that a lot of the customers who are choosing our New York competitors are trapped in a really bad relationship,” Arken said. “What we can assure you is that if you choose to fly to Long Island MacArthur Airport, you will stress less and you will pay less.”  Officials from Islip Town, which owns and operates the Ronkonkoma airport, have been trying for years to develop new strategies that would aid the financially struggling airport, which operated at a loss totaling nearly $4 million from 2012 through 2014. According to figures provided by the town, 1,356,162 people flew to and from the airport in 2012; in 2016 that number was 1,211,951. In 2016, the total number of flights operating in and out of MacArthur was 124,164, down from 148,451 in 2012. Town expenditures have decreased at the airport over the last two years, resulting in a surplus of about $155,000 in 2015, town figures show.     Business7 airlines that flew away from LI's MacArthur Airport
 

“We are so, so committed to maximizing this incredible resource,” Town Supervisor Angie Carpenter said. “The airport is a tremendous economic generator with over $600 million in economic activity generated because of what happens here at this airport. The potential is huge.”

Read more...

Pro Star Aviation Welcomes NH Native, Matt Sargent back to the Granite State

Matt SargentIn preparation of ramping up their Challenger maintenance program at Manchester-Boston Regional Airport (MHT) in Londonderry, NH, Pro Star Aviation proudly welcomes new hire, Matt Sargent to their ranks.  Matt, both eager and excited to start his journey with Pro Star, brings nearly thirty (30) years of dedicated corporate aviation maintenance experience with him.

According to Pro Star Aviation’s Director of Maintenance, Chris Mancini, “I’ve known Matt for many years and have great respect for his knowledge and workmanship. Hiring Matt is going to be a fantastic step forward for Pro Star Aviation and our ability to perform work on all models of Challenger aircraft.”

Well known throughout the Bombardier network for his extensive knowledge of the Challenger series aircraft, Matt began his career at that company’s Hartford facility when it was known as the Canadair Challenger Service Center. His expertise with the Challenger airframe  is both deep and wide; multiple years as an engine technician, airframe lead technician, capped off by sixteen years as structural lead technician supervising a crew of fourteen.

Entrusted with some of the Series’ largest-ever work packages, Matt has been instrumental in the wing demate and remate of several Challenger aircraft, complete overhaul of a Challenger 601, and removal and installation of Challenger 604 nose sections, among others. His work consisted of not only carrying out the physical work, but also drafting up work packages, quoting the job, and seeing it through to completion - always with an eye towards quality and customer service. One Senior Manager of Maintenance describes Matt as, “a man of his word and his commitment is golden.”

A proud veteran of the United States Navy and proud New Hampshire native, Matt will reside in Wolfeboro with his wife, daughter, and two rescue dogs. For Matt, getting the chance to return home to the Granite State and help grow the Challenger program at Pro Star, is a dream come true.

ABOUT PRO STAR AVIATION

Pro Star Aviation specializes in business and corporate aircraft installations, maintenance and modifications. The company offers avionics service and installations; major alterations and repairs; STC development and certification service; AOG support and service; and Part 135 and 91 aircraft management service. Its main facility located at the Manchester-Boston Regional Airport (MHT) in Londonderry, NH, serves customers on-site and on-location throughout the Northeast United States. www.prostaraviation.com

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