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LIBAA News & Aviation Industry Updates

Business Aviation news from all over Long Island and the New York metropolitan area aviation companies, airports and government sources keeping you current on all the business aviation news that effects you and your company

Islip launches new ‘stress less, pay less’ campaign for MacArthur Airport

Updated March 23, 2017 
By  sarah.armaghan@newsday.com

Islip Town officials want Long Islanders to know they will “stress less and pay less” when flying out of Long Island MacArthur Airport — a slogan unveiled Thursday morning as part of a new $180,000 marketing initiative.

Hoping to grow business at the airport, an advertising campaign will include promotional signs at Long Island Rail Road stations and on the sides of buses, and radio spots. A new logo features the airport code, ISP, next to a shaded map of the Island, and a new website, FlyMacArthur.com, has been launched.

“We are going to aggressively campaign against our New York competitors,

Kennedy and LaGuardia,” said Shelley LaRose Arken, the airport’s commissioner, at

a news conference inside the airport.

Arken said that, overall, MacArthur offers efficient security lines, convenient parking, and fewer delays and cancellations than other major airports in the metropolitan area. She also said flights at MacArthur are 45 percent less expensive than those at John F. Kennedy International Airport and 16 percent less costly than at LaGuardia Airport.

After the news conference, Arken said these statistics were gleaned from a quarterly U.S. Department of Transportation report, which showed the average price of all domestic fares for each U.S. airport in June 2016.

Carmela Bleich, general manager for Creative Travel International, a travel agency based in Melville, said “there’s no one straight answer” in comparing flight prices across airports and that availability, inventory and time of purchase all become factors in cost.

“You can’t really say that’s the case across the board that one is cheaper than the other,” said Bleich, who said she has been a travel agent for 30 years on Long Island. “If you’re talking about fare prices to the same destinations, saying they’re cheaper from MacArthur would not always be accurate.”

Residents in western Suffolk and in Nassau counties will be targeted in the advertising blitz in an attempt to lure them from booking travel through JFK and LaGuardia.

Southwest Airlines, Elite Airways and American Airlines currently operate seven daily nonstop flights out of MacArthur, and Arken hopes that by attracting new customers, additional flights will be added, followed by more nonstop routes and interest from other carriers.

“We think that a lot of the customers who are choosing our New York competitors are trapped in a really bad relationship,” Arken said. “What we can assure you is that if you choose to fly to Long Island MacArthur Airport, you will stress less and you will pay less.”  Officials from Islip Town, which owns and operates the Ronkonkoma airport, have been trying for years to develop new strategies that would aid the financially struggling airport, which operated at a loss totaling nearly $4 million from 2012 through 2014. According to figures provided by the town, 1,356,162 people flew to and from the airport in 2012; in 2016 that number was 1,211,951. In 2016, the total number of flights operating in and out of MacArthur was 124,164, down from 148,451 in 2012. Town expenditures have decreased at the airport over the last two years, resulting in a surplus of about $155,000 in 2015, town figures show.     Business7 airlines that flew away from LI's MacArthur Airport
 

 

 

 

“We are so, so committed to maximizing this incredible resource,” Town Supervisor Angie Carpenter said. “The airport is a tremendous economic generator with over $600 million in economic activity generated because of what happens here at this airport. The potential is huge.”

Read more...

Islip launches new ‘stress less, pay less’ campaign for MacArthur Airport

Updated March 23, 2017 
By  sarah.armaghan@newsday.com

Islip Town officials want Long Islanders to know they will “stress less and pay less” when flying out of Long Island MacArthur Airport — a slogan unveiled Thursday morning as part of a new $180,000 marketing initiative.

Hoping to grow business at the airport, an advertising campaign will include promotional signs at Long Island Rail Road stations and on the sides of buses, and radio spots. A new logo features the airport code, ISP, next to a shaded map of the Island, and a new website, FlyMacArthur.com, has been launched.

“We are going to aggressively campaign against our New York competitors, Kennedy and LaGuardia,” said Shelley LaRose Arken, the airport’s commissioner, at a news conference inside the airport.

Arken said that, overall, MacArthur offers efficient security lines, convenient parking, and fewer delays and cancellations than other major airports in the metropolitan area. She also said flights at MacArthur are 45 percent less expensive than those at John F. Kennedy International Airport and 16 percent less costly than at LaGuardia Airport.

After the news conference, Arken said these statistics were gleaned from a quarterly U.S. Department of Transportation report, which showed the average price of all domestic fares for each U.S. airport in June 2016.

Carmela Bleich, general manager for Creative Travel International, a travel agency based in Melville, said “there’s no one straight answer” in comparing flight prices across airports and that availability, inventory and time of purchase all become factors in cost.

“You can’t really say that’s the case across the board that one is cheaper than the other,” said Bleich, who said she has been a travel agent for 30 years on Long Island. “If you’re talking about fare prices to the same destinations, saying they’re cheaper from MacArthur would not always be accurate.”

Residents in western Suffolk and in Nassau counties will be targeted in the advertising blitz in an attempt to lure them from booking travel through JFK and LaGuardia.

Southwest Airlines, Elite Airways and American Airlines currently operate seven daily nonstop flights out of MacArthur, and Arken hopes that by attracting new customers, additional flights will be added, followed by more nonstop routes and interest from other carriers.

“We think that a lot of the customers who are choosing our New York competitors are trapped in a really bad relationship,” Arken said. “What we can assure you is that if you choose to fly to Long Island MacArthur Airport, you will stress less and you will pay less.”  Officials from Islip Town, which owns and operates the Ronkonkoma airport, have been trying for years to develop new strategies that would aid the financially struggling airport, which operated at a loss totaling nearly $4 million from 2012 through 2014. According to figures provided by the town, 1,356,162 people flew to and from the airport in 2012; in 2016 that number was 1,211,951. In 2016, the total number of flights operating in and out of MacArthur was 124,164, down from 148,451 in 2012. Town expenditures have decreased at the airport over the last two years, resulting in a surplus of about $155,000 in 2015, town figures show.     Business7 airlines that flew away from LI's MacArthur Airport
 

“We are so, so committed to maximizing this incredible resource,” Town Supervisor Angie Carpenter said. “The airport is a tremendous economic generator with over $600 million in economic activity generated because of what happens here at this airport. The potential is huge.”

Read more...

Pro Star Aviation Welcomes NH Native, Matt Sargent back to the Granite State

Matt SargentIn preparation of ramping up their Challenger maintenance program at Manchester-Boston Regional Airport (MHT) in Londonderry, NH, Pro Star Aviation proudly welcomes new hire, Matt Sargent to their ranks.  Matt, both eager and excited to start his journey with Pro Star, brings nearly thirty (30) years of dedicated corporate aviation maintenance experience with him.

According to Pro Star Aviation’s Director of Maintenance, Chris Mancini, “I’ve known Matt for many years and have great respect for his knowledge and workmanship. Hiring Matt is going to be a fantastic step forward for Pro Star Aviation and our ability to perform work on all models of Challenger aircraft.”

Well known throughout the Bombardier network for his extensive knowledge of the Challenger series aircraft, Matt began his career at that company’s Hartford facility when it was known as the Canadair Challenger Service Center. His expertise with the Challenger airframe  is both deep and wide; multiple years as an engine technician, airframe lead technician, capped off by sixteen years as structural lead technician supervising a crew of fourteen.

Entrusted with some of the Series’ largest-ever work packages, Matt has been instrumental in the wing demate and remate of several Challenger aircraft, complete overhaul of a Challenger 601, and removal and installation of Challenger 604 nose sections, among others. His work consisted of not only carrying out the physical work, but also drafting up work packages, quoting the job, and seeing it through to completion - always with an eye towards quality and customer service. One Senior Manager of Maintenance describes Matt as, “a man of his word and his commitment is golden.”

A proud veteran of the United States Navy and proud New Hampshire native, Matt will reside in Wolfeboro with his wife, daughter, and two rescue dogs. For Matt, getting the chance to return home to the Granite State and help grow the Challenger program at Pro Star, is a dream come true.

ABOUT PRO STAR AVIATION

Pro Star Aviation specializes in business and corporate aircraft installations, maintenance and modifications. The company offers avionics service and installations; major alterations and repairs; STC development and certification service; AOG support and service; and Part 135 and 91 aircraft management service. Its main facility located at the Manchester-Boston Regional Airport (MHT) in Londonderry, NH, serves customers on-site and on-location throughout the Northeast United States. www.prostaraviation.com

East Hampton Airport: A Victory for Aviation, But Disputes Continue

At New York's East Hampton Airport (HTO) on Long Island, a lengthy legal fight has come down squarely on the side of NBAA and other aviation stakeholders, which had argued that the town's adoption of noise and access restrictions was a violation of federal law.

 

On Nov. 4, 2016, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit issued a decision agreeing with NBAA that the Airport Noise and Capacity Act of 1990 (ANCA) continues to apply to HTO. ANCA requires airports to engage in a detailed study and to obtain FAA approval for noise-based and other access restrictions before they can be implemented. View the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit Decision. (PDF)

On Jan. 11, the U.S. District Court entered an injunction prohibiting the enforcement of the curfews and other restrictions at issue for HTO. View the injunction. (PDF)

"This ruling by the Second Circuit sets an important precedent for all public-use airports nationwide," said Alex Gertsen, NBAA director, airports and ground infrastructure. "Despite the town of East Hampton's stated intent to no longer accept federal Airport Improvement Program grants, the court's decision holds that ANCA – which was specifically adopted by Congress to prevent access restrictions from being imposed on a piecemeal basis by airports across the country – continues to apply to HTO."

East Hampton town officials have indicated that they plan on petitioning the U.S. Supreme Court to review the Second Circuit appeals court decision, even though town Councilwoman Kathee Burke-Gonzalez has acknowledged it will be an uphill battle. NBAA's Gertsen agreed, noting that previous court decisions have all been consistent with the Second Circuit's interpretation of ANCA.

"We don't believe the Supreme Court will take on this issue," said Gertsen.

The controversy arose in April 2015, when East Hampton adopted three restrictions for aircraft operations at HTO: A year-round general curfew (11 p.m.-7 a.m.), a year-round extended curfew for "noisy" aircraft (8 p.m.-9 a.m.) and a summertime one-trip-per-week limit for the aircraft deemed by the town to be noisy. In June 2015, a federal district court judge preliminarily upheld the town ordinances instituting the mandatory nighttime curfew, as well as the extended curfew on noisy aircraft, which have been enforced since July 2015. However, the court preliminarily enjoined the town from imposing a one-trip-a-week restriction.

Dean Saucier, NBAA's Northeast regional representative reiterated that "regardless of the curfews and restrictions being in place by the town, aviation operators at HTO, in fact, have long respected the concerns of local residents and have made every attempt to fly neighborly." According to Saucier, the Eastern Region Helicopter Council (ERHC) has even developed new routes, based on noise monitors ERHC had previously installed to determine how to best approach and depart HTO, to avoid sensitive areas.

NBAA is advising operators who received summonses or paid fines in the past to contact the town of East Hampton town attorney's office at 631-324-8787 to discuss their case on an individual basis.

NBAA also filed an administrative complaint with the FAA, which separately challenges the restrictions on the basis of the town's grant-based obligations, and questions whether East Hampton has inappropriately used airport revenues to pay for its legal expenses in defending the restrictions it enacted. A decision on the complaint is anticipated later this year.

"The victory in the Second Circuit is an important step in the success of NBAA's efforts in protecting access to airports," said Gertsen. "We will continue to remain vigilant and will oppose efforts that seek to limit the utility of airports like HTO and seek to cripple the overall viability of the National Airspace System."

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Long Island Groups’ Bumper Sticker Makes Clear: No Plane, No Gain

bumperstickerThe Long Island Business Aviation Association (LIBAA) and Long Island Professional Aircraft Maintenance Association (LIPAMA) have produced a bumper sticker to promote business aviation in the region.

Echoing imagery and a central message of the No Plane No Gain advocacy campaign – jointly sponsored by the National Business Aviation Association and the General Aviation Manufacturers Association – the bumper sticker depicts a business aviation plane on an American flag background and states, “Business Aviation is Good for America.”

The groups’ joint goal is to demonstrate the value of business aviation to New York’s Long Island, which is home to one commercial service airport – Long Island MacArthur Airport – and several general aviation airports and heliports.

“General aviation airports throughout the Island open up our communities to various commerce, and are beneficial to companies with headquarters located near these airports,” said Gene Portela, president and CEO of Corporate Service Supply & Manufacturing, and an LIBAA board member.

A 2013 PricewaterhouseCoopers economic impact study found New York to be one of the top 10 states ranked by total number of jobs attributable to general aviation, with 37,800 jobs attributed to general aviation. General aviation adds $4.5 billion to the state’s gross domestic product, according to the report.

LIBAA and LIPAMA often work together to advocate for business aviation, and the associations have also worked with NBAA on various advocacy initiatives over the years.

“The two organizations get together quite frequently to support each other, hold joint meetings and events, to not only advance the causes of aviation locally on Long Island, but to promote business aviation and its intrinsic values to American industry nationwide,” said Portela. 

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